definitions
  • synonyms

proper

[ prop-er ]
/ ˈprɒp ər /
||
SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR proper ON THESAURUS.COM

adjective

adverb

Informal. thoroughly; completely.

noun

Ecclesiastical. a special office or special parts of an office appointed for a particular day or time.

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RELATED WORDS

accordingly, perfectly, well, accurately, rightly, suitably, fitly

Nearby words

propension, propensity, propenyl, propenyl group, propepsin, proper, proper adjective, proper fasciculus, proper fraction, proper function, proper motion

Origin of proper

1250–1300; Middle English propre < Old French < Latin proprius one's own
SYNONYMS FOR proper
Related formsprop·er·ly, adverbprop·er·ness, nounun·prop·er, adjectiveun·prop·er·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for properly

British Dictionary definitions for properly

proper

/ (ˈprɒpə) /

adjective

adverb

British dialect (intensifier)he's proper stupid
good and proper informal thoroughlyto get drunk good and proper

noun

the parts of the Mass that vary according to the particular day or feast on which the Mass is celebratedCompare ordinary (def. 10)
Derived Formsproperly, adverbproperness, noun

Word Origin for proper

C13: via Old French from Latin prōprius special
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for properly

proper


adj.

c.1300, "adapted to some purpose, fit, apt; commendable, excellent" (sometimes ironic), from Old French propre "own, particular; exact, neat, fitting, appropriate" (11c.), from Latin proprius "one's own, particular to itself," from pro privo "for the individual, in particular," from ablative of privus "one's own, individual" (see private (adj.)) + pro "for" (see pro-). Related: Properly.

From early 14c. as "belonging or pertaining to oneself; individual; intrinsic;" from mid-14c. as "pertaining to a person or thing in particular, special, specific; distinctive, characteristic;" also "what is by the rules, correct, appropriate, acceptable." From early 15c. as "separate, distinct; itself." Meaning "socially appropriate, decent, respectable" is first recorded 1704. Proper name "name belonging to or relating to the person or thing in question," is from late 13c., a sense also preserved in astronomical proper motion (c.1300). Proper noun is from c.1500.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper