prosody

[ pros-uh-dee ]
/ ˈprɒs ə di /

noun

the science or study of poetic meters and versification.
a particular or distinctive system of metrics and versification: Milton's prosody.
Linguistics. the stress and intonation patterns of an utterance.

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Origin of prosody

1400–50; late Middle English <Latin prosōdia<Greek prosōidía tone or accent, modulation of voice, song sung to music, equivalent to prós toward + ōid() ode + -ia-y3

OTHER WORDS FROM prosody

pro·sod·ic [pruh-sod-ik], /prəˈsɒd ɪk/, pro·sod·i·cal, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for prosody

British Dictionary definitions for prosody

prosody
/ (ˈprɒsədɪ) /

noun

the study of poetic metre and of the art of versification, including rhyme, stanzaic forms, and the quantity and stress of syllables
a system of versification
the patterns of stress and intonation in a language

Derived forms of prosody

prosodic (prəˈsɒdɪk), adjectiveprosodist, noun

Word Origin for prosody

C15: from Latin prosōdia accent of a syllable, from Greek prosōidia song set to music, from pros towards + ōidē, from aoidē song; see ode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012