prudence

[ prood-ns ]
/ ˈprud ns /

noun

the quality or fact of being prudent, or wise in practical affairs, as by providing for the future.
caution with regard to practical matters; discretion.
regard for one's own interests.
provident care in the management of resources; economy; frugality.

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Origin of prudence

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin prūdentia.See prudent, -ence

synonym study for prudence

1. Prudence, calculation, foresight, forethought imply attempted provision against possible contingencies. Prudence is care, caution, and good judgment, as well as wisdom in looking ahead: sober prudence in handling one's affairs. Calculation suggests a disposition to get a large return for as small an outlay as possible and willingness to benefit at the expense of others: cold calculation. Foresight implies a prudent looking ahead rather far into the future: clear foresight in planning. Forethought emphasizes the adequacy of preparation for the future: Careful forethought helped him deal with the emergency.

OTHER WORDS FROM prudence

non·pru·dence, noun

Words nearby prudence

Definition for prudence (2 of 2)

Prudence
[ prood-ns ]
/ ˈprud ns /

noun

a female given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for prudence

British Dictionary definitions for prudence

prudence
/ (ˈpruːdəns) /

noun

caution in practical affairs; discretion or circumspection
care taken in the management of one's resources
consideration for one's own interests
the condition or quality of being prudent
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012