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pull-in

[ pool-in ]
/ ˈpʊlˌɪn /
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noun, adjective British.

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Origin of pull-in

First recorded in 1935–40; noun, adj. use of verb phrase pull in
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for pull-in

pull in

verb (adverb)

(intr often foll by to) to reach a destinationthe train pulled in at the station
Also: pull over (intr) (of a motor vehicle, driver, etc)
  1. to draw in to the side of the road in order to stop or to allow another vehicle to pass
  2. to stop (at a café, lay-by, etc)
(tr) to draw or attracthis appearance will pull in the crowds
(tr) slang to arrest
(tr) to earn or gain (money)

noun pull-in

British a roadside café, esp for lorry drivers
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with pull-in

pull in

1

Arrive at a destination, as in The train pulled in right on time. [c. 1900]

2

Rein in, restrain, as in She pulled in her horse, or The executives did not want to pull in their most aggressive salesmen. [c. 1600]

3

Arrest a suspect, as in The police said they could pull him in on lesser charges. [Late 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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