punch-out

[puhnch-out]

noun

a small section of cardboard or metal surrounded by perforations so that it can be easily forced out.
Slang. a fistfight or brawl.

Nearby words

  1. punch spoon,
  2. punch-and-judy show,
  3. punch-bowl,
  4. punch-drunk,
  5. punch-drunk syndrome,
  6. punch-up,
  7. punchbag,
  8. punchball,
  9. punchboard,
  10. punchbowl

Origin of punch-out

First recorded in 1925–30; noun use of verb phrase punch out

punch

1
[puhnch]

noun

a thrusting blow, especially with the fist.
forcefulness, effectiveness, or pungency in content or appeal; power; zest: a letter to voters that needs more punch.

verb (used with object)

to give a sharp thrust or blow to, especially with the fist.
Western U.S. and Western Canada. to drive (cattle).
to poke or prod, as with a stick.
Informal. to deliver (lines in a play, a musical passage, or the like) with vigor.
to strike or hit in operating: to punch the typewriter keys.
to put into operation with or as if with a blow: to punch a time clock.
Baseball. to hit (the ball) with a short, chopping motion rather than with a full swing: He punched a soft liner just over third base for a base hit.

verb (used without object)

to give a sharp blow to a person or thing, as with the fist: The boxer punches well.

Verb Phrases

punch away, Informal. to keep trying or working, especially in difficult or discouraging circumstances; persevere: punching away at the same old job.
punch in,
  1. to record one's time of arrival at work by punching a time clock.
  2. to keyboard (information) into a computer: to punch in the inventory figures.
punch out,
  1. to record one's time of departure from work by punching a time clock.
  2. Slang.to beat up or knock out with the fists.
  3. to extract (information) from a computer by the use of a keyboard: to punch out data on last week's sales.
  4. to bail out; eject from an aircraft.
punch up,
  1. to call up (information) on a computer by the use of a keyboard: to punch up a list of hotel reservations.
  2. Informal.to enliven, as with fresh ideas or additional material: You'd better punch up that speech with a few jokes.

Origin of punch

1
1350–1400; Middle English punchen (v.); apparently variant of pounce1

Related formspunch·er, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for punch out

punch

1

verb

to strike blows (at), esp with a clenched fist
(tr) Western US to herd or drive (cattle), esp for a living
(tr) to poke or prod with a stick or similar object
punch above one's weight to do something that is considered to be beyond one's ability

noun

a blow with the fist
informal telling force, point, or vigourhis arguments lacked punch
pull one's punches See pull (def. 26)
Derived Formspuncher, noun

Word Origin for punch

C15: perhaps a variant of pounce ²

punch

2

noun

a tool or machine for piercing holes in a material
any of various tools used for knocking a bolt, rivet, etc, out of a hole
a tool or machine used for stamping a design on something or shaping it by impact
the solid die of a punching machine for cutting, stamping, or shaping material
computing a device, such as a card punch or tape punch, used for making holes in a card or paper tape

verb

(tr) to pierce, cut, stamp, shape, or drive with a punch

Word Origin for punch

C14: shortened from puncheon, from Old French ponçon; see puncheon ²

punch

3

noun

any mixed drink containing fruit juice and, usually, alcoholic liquor, generally hot and spiced

Word Origin for punch

C17: perhaps from Hindi pānch, from Sanskrit pañca five; the beverage originally included five ingredients

Punch

noun

the main character in the traditional children's puppet show Punch and Judy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for punch out
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with punch out

punch out

1

Record one's time of departure from work, as in We never punch out at exactly five o'clock. This usage, dating from the 1920s, alludes to the use of a time clock. Also see punch in, def. 1.

2

Eject from a military aircraft, as in The pilot punched out just before the plane blew up. [Slang; 1960s]

punch

In addition to the idioms beginning with punch

  • punch in
  • punch out

also see:

  • beat to it (the punch)
  • can't punch one's way out of a paper bag
  • pack a punch
  • pleased as punch
  • pull no punches
  • roll with the punches
  • sucker punch
  • throw a punch
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.