pure

[ pyoor ]
/ pyʊər /
||

adjective, pur·er, pur·est.


Nearby words

  1. purchasing agent,
  2. purchasing power,
  3. purdah,
  4. purdonium,
  5. purdy,
  6. pure absence,
  7. pure and simple,
  8. pure as the driven snow,
  9. pure culture,
  10. pure democracy

Origin of pure

1250–1300; Middle English pur < Old French < Latin pūrus clean, unmixed, plain, pure

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See clean.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for pure


British Dictionary definitions for pure

pure

/ (pjʊə) /

adjective

Derived Formspureness, noun

Word Origin for pure

C13: from Old French pur, from Latin pūrus unstained

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for pure

pure

adj.

c.1300 (late 12c. as a surname, and Old English had purlamb "lamb without a blemish"), "unmixed," also "absolutely, entirely," from Old French pur "pure, simple, absolute, unalloyed," figuratively "simple, sheer, mere" (12c.), from Latin purus "clean, clear; unmixed; unadorned; chaste, undefiled," from PIE root *peue- "to purify, cleanse" (cf. Latin putus "clear, pure;" Sanskrit pavate "purifies, cleanses," putah "pure;" Middle Irish ur "fresh, new;" Old High German fowen "to sift").

Replaced Old English hlutor. Meaning "free from moral corruption" is first recorded mid-14c. In reference to bloodlines, attested from late 15c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for pure

pure

[ pyur ]

adj.

Having a homogeneous or uniform composition; not mixed.
Free from adulterants or impurities.
Produced by self-fertilization or continual inbreeding; homozygous.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.