put-out

[ poo t-out ]
/ ˈpʊtˌaʊt /

noun Baseball.

an instance of putting out a batter or base runner.

Origin of put-out

1880–85, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase put out

Definition for put out (2 of 2)

Origin of put

before 1000; Middle English put(t)en to push, thrust, put, Old English *putian (as verbal noun putung an impelling, inciting); akin to pytan, potian to push, goad, cognate with Old Norse pota to thrust, poke

Related forms

well-put, adjective

Can be confused

put putt

Synonym study

1. Put, place, lay, set mean to bring or take an object (or cause it to go) to a certain location or position, there to leave it. Put is the general word: to put the dishes on the table; to put one's hair up. Place is a more formal word, suggesting precision of movement or definiteness of location: He placed his hand on the Bible. Lay, meaning originally to cause to lie, and set, meaning originally to cause to sit, are used particularly to stress the position in which an object is put: lay usually suggests putting an object rather carefully into a horizontal position: to lay a pattern out on the floor. Set usually means to place upright: to set a child on a horse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for put out (1 of 2)

put out


verb (tr, adverb)

noun putout

baseball a play in which the batter or runner is put out

British Dictionary definitions for put out (2 of 2)

put

/ (pʊt) /

verb puts, putting or put (mainly tr)

noun

a throw or cast, esp in putting the shot
Also called: put option stock exchange an option to sell a stated amount of securities at a specified price during a specified limited periodCompare call (def. 58)

Word Origin for put

C12 puten to push; related to Old English potian to push, Norwegian, Icelandic pota to poke
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with put out (1 of 2)

put out


1

Extinguish, as in We put out the fire before we turned in. [Early 1500s]

2

Also, put to sea. Leave a port or harbor, as in They put out yesterday morning. [Late 1500s]

3

Publish, as in They put out a weekly newsletter. [Early 1500s]

4

Engage in sex. This usage is applied solely to women, as in She had a reputation for putting out. [Vulgar slang; mid-1900s] Also see put one out.

Idioms and Phrases with put out (2 of 2)

put


In addition to the idioms beginning with put

  • put a bug in someone's ear
  • put across
  • put a damper on
  • put all one's eggs in one basket
  • put an end to
  • put an idea in one's head
  • put a premium on
  • put aside
  • put a spin on
  • put at ease
  • put at someone's disposal
  • put away
  • put back the clock
  • put behind one
  • put by
  • put down
  • put down roots
  • put forth
  • put forward
  • put hair on one's chest
  • put heads together
  • put ideas into someone's head
  • put in
  • put in a good word
  • put in an appearance
  • put in mind of
  • put in mothballs
  • put in one's place
  • put in one's two cents
  • put in order
  • put in the way of
  • put into effect
  • put into practice
  • put into words
  • put it mildly
  • put it to
  • put lead in one's pencil
  • put money on
  • put off
  • put on
  • put on a brave face
  • put on a brave front
  • put on airs
  • put on an act
  • put on a pedestal
  • put one in mind of
  • put one into the picture
  • put one off
  • put one off one's stride
  • put one out
  • put one's back into it
  • put one's back up
  • put one's best foot forward
  • put one's cards on the table
  • put oneself in someone's place
  • put oneself out
  • put one's face on
  • put one's feet up
  • put one's finger on
  • put one's foot down
  • put one's foot in it
  • put one's hand to
  • put one's head on the block
  • put one's house in order
  • put one's mind to
  • put one's money where one's mouth is
  • put one's nose out of joint
  • put one's oar in
  • put one's shoulder to the wheel
  • put on hold
  • put on ice
  • put on one's thinking cap
  • put on the dog
  • put on the feed bag
  • put on the map
  • put on the spot
  • put on weight
  • put our heads together
  • put out
  • put out feelers
  • put out of business
  • put out of one's mind
  • put out to grass
  • put over
  • put paid to
  • put right
  • put someone away
  • put someone down
  • put someone in his or her place
  • put someone on
  • put someone out of his or her misery
  • put someone right
  • put someone through his or her paces
  • put someone up
  • put someone up to
  • put someone wise
  • put that in your pipe and smoke it
  • put the arm on
  • put the blame on
  • put the cart before the horse
  • put the fear of God into
  • put the finger on
  • put the heat on
  • put their heads together
  • put the kibosh on
  • put the lid on
  • put the make on
  • put the screws on
  • put the skids on
  • put the skids under
  • put through
  • put through the wringer
  • put to bed
  • put to death
  • put to flight
  • put together
  • put to good use
  • put to it, be
  • put to rights
  • put to sea
  • put to shame
  • put to sleep
  • put to the test
  • put two and two together
  • put up
  • put upon, be
  • put up or shut up
  • put up with
  • put wise
  • put words in someone's mouth

also see:

  • (put) at ease
  • (put on a) brave face
  • cart before the horse, put
  • clamp down (put the clamps on)
  • flesh out (put flesh and bone on)
  • for (put in one's) two cents
  • (put on a) hair shirt
  • hard put
  • (put) in effect
  • (put) in the picture
  • lay (put) one's cards on the table
  • lay (put) one's hands on
  • lay (put) the blame on
  • (put someone's) nose out of joint
  • not put something past someone
  • (put) off the track
  • (put) on a pedestal
  • (put) out of business
  • pull (put over) a fast one
  • put one's head on the block
  • throw (put) off the scent

Also see underset.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.