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put-up

[ poot-uhp ]
/ ˈpʊtˌʌp /
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adjective Informal.
planned beforehand in a secret or crafty manner: a put-up job.
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Origin of put-up

First recorded in 1800–10; adj. use of verb phrase put up
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use put-up in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for put-up

put up

verb (adverb, mainly tr)
adjective put-up
dishonestly or craftily prearranged or conceived (esp in the phrase put-up job)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with put-up

put up

1

Erect, build; also, lift to a higher position. For example, They put up three new houses on our street, or She looks more grownup when she puts up her hair in a bun. [c. 1600]

2

Preserve, can, as in She put up countless jars of jam. [Early 1800s]

3

Nominate, as in Tom put up Peter for president. [Late 1500s]

4

Provide funds, especially in advance, as in They put up nearly a million for the new museum.

5

put someone up. Provide lodgings for, as in We can put you up for the night. [Mid-1700s]

6

Startle game from cover, as in The hunter put up three grouse. [Late 1400s]

7

Offer for sale, as in They had to put up their last antiques. [Early 1700s]

8

Make a display or appearance of, as in They were actually broke but put up a good front. [First half of 1800s]

9

Do well in a contest, as in They put up a good fight. [Late 1800s]

10

Stake money for a bet, as in Each player put up ten dollars. [Mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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