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pyruvic acid

noun

, Chemistry, Biochemistry.
  1. a water-soluble liquid, C 3 H 4 O 3 , important in many metabolic and fermentative processes, having an odor resembling that of acetic acid, prepared by the dehydration of tartaric acid: used chiefly in biochemical research.


pyruvic acid

/ paɪˈruːvɪk /

noun

  1. a colourless pleasant-smelling liquid formed as an intermediate in the metabolism of proteins and carbohydrates, helping to release energy to the body; 2-oxopropanoic acid. Formula: CH 3 COCOOH


pyruvic acid

/ pī-ro̅o̅vĭk /

  1. A colorless organic liquid formed by the breakdown of carbohydrates and sugars during cell metabolism. It is the final product of glycolysis and is converted into acetyl coenzyme A, which is required for the Krebs cycle. It is also used in the body to synthesize the amino acid alanine. Chemical formula: C 3 H 4 O 3 .


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Word History and Origins

Origin of pyruvic acid1

First recorded in 1830–40

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Word History and Origins

Origin of pyruvic acid1

C19: pyruvic from pyro- + Latin ūva grape

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Compare Meanings

How does pyruvic acid compare to similar and commonly confused words? Explore the most common comparisons:

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Example Sentences

(b) The pyruvic acid is then decomposed by carboxylase yielding aldehyde and carbon dioxide (equation 2, p. 109).

The third stage of Lebedeff's theory postulates the intermediate formation of pyruvic acid.

The decomposition of pyruvic acid into acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide has already been fully discussed (Chapter VI).

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pyruvicpyruvic aldehyde