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quebracho

[ key-brah-choh; Spanish ke-brah-chaw ]
/ keɪˈbrɑ tʃoʊ; Spanish kɛˈβrɑ tʃɔ /
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noun, plural que·bra·chos [key-brah-chohz; Spanish ke-brah-chaws]. /keɪˈbrɑ tʃoʊz; Spanish kɛˈβrɑ tʃɔs/.

any of several tropical American trees of the genus Schinopsis, having very hard wood, especially S. lorentzii, the wood and bark of which are important in tanning and dyeing.
a tree, Aspidosperma quebrachoblanco, of the dogbane family, yielding a medicinal bark.
the wood or bark of any of these trees.

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Origin of quebracho

First recorded in 1880–85; from American Spanish, variant of quiebracha, quiebra-hacha literally, “(it) breaks (the) hatchet”; see quebrada, hatchet
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use quebracho in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for quebracho

quebracho
/ (keɪˈbrɑːtʃəʊ, Spanish keˈβratʃo) /

noun plural -chos (-tʃəʊz, Spanish -tʃos)

either of two anacardiaceous South American trees, Schinopsis lorentzii or S. balansae, having a tannin-rich hard wood used in tanning and dyeing
an apocynaceous South American tree, Aspidosperma quebrachoblanco, whose bark yields alkaloids used in medicine and tanning
the wood or bark of any of these trees
any of various other South American trees having hard wood

Word Origin for quebracho

C19: from American Spanish, from quiebracha, from quebrar to break (from Latin crepāre to rattle) + hacha axe (from French hache)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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