Rabbinic

[ ruh-bin-ik ]
/ rəˈbɪn ɪk /
|

noun

the Hebrew language as used by rabbis in post-Biblical times.

Origin of Rabbinic

1605–15; < Medieval Latin rabbīn(us) of a rabbi1 + -ic

rabbinical

or rab·bin·ic

[ ruh-bin-i-kuh l or ruh-bin-ik ]
/ rəˈbɪn ɪ kəl or rəˈbɪn ɪk /

adjective

of or relating to rabbis or their learning, writings, etc.
for the rabbinate: a rabbinical school.

Origin of rabbinical

1615–25; < Medieval Latin rabbīn(us) of a rabbi1 + -ical

Related formsnon·rab·bin·i·cal, adjectiveun·rab·bin·ic, adjectiveun·rab·bin·i·cal, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rabbinic


British Dictionary definitions for rabbinic

rabbinic

rabbinical (rəˈbɪnɪkəl)

/ (rəˈbɪnɪk) /

adjective

of or relating to the rabbis, their teachings, writings, views, language, etc
Derived Formsrabbinically, adverb

Rabbinic

Rabbinical Hebrew

/ (rəˈbɪnɪk) /

noun

the form of the Hebrew language used by the rabbis of the Middle Ages
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for rabbinic

rabbinical

adj.

1620s, earlier rabbinic (1610s); see Rabbi + -ical. The -n- is perhaps via rabbin "rabbi" (1520s), an alternative form, from French rabbin, from Medieval Latin rabbinus (also source of Italian rabbino, Spanish and Portuguese rabino), perhaps from a presumed Semitic plural in -n, or from Aramaic rabban "our teacher," "distinguishing title given to patriarchs and the presidents of the Sanhedrin since the time of Gamaliel the Elder" [Klein], from Aramaic plural of noun use of rabh "great."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper