race

1
[ reys ]
/ reɪs /

noun

verb (used without object), raced, rac·ing.

verb (used with object), raced, rac·ing.

Origin of race

1
1250–1300; (noun) Middle English ras(e) < Old Norse rās a running, race (cognate with Old English rǣs a running); (v.) Middle English rasen, derivative of the noun (compare Old Norse rasa to rush headlong)

Related forms

an·ti·rac·ing, adjectivepre·rac·ing, adjectivepro·rac·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for racing

British Dictionary definitions for racing (1 of 5)

racing

/ (ˈreɪsɪŋ) /

adjective

denoting or associated with horse racesthe racing fraternity; a racing man

noun

the practice of engaging horses (or sometimes greyhounds) in contests of speed

British Dictionary definitions for racing (2 of 5)

Race

/ (reɪs) /

noun

Cape Race a cape at the SE extremity of Newfoundland, Canada

British Dictionary definitions for racing (3 of 5)

race

1
/ (reɪs) /

noun

verb

See also race off, races

Word Origin for race

C13: from Old Norse rās running; related to Old English rǣs attack

British Dictionary definitions for racing (4 of 5)

race

2
/ (reɪs) /

noun

a group of people of common ancestry, distinguished from others by physical characteristics, such as hair type, colour of eyes and skin, stature, etc. Principal races are Caucasoid, Mongoloid, and Negroid
the human race human beings collectively
a group of animals or plants having common characteristics that distinguish them from other members of the same species, usually forming a geographically isolated group; subspecies
a group of people sharing the same interests, characteristics, etcthe race of authors
play the race card informal to introduce the subject of race into a public discussion, esp to gain a strategic advantage

Word Origin for race

C16: from French, from Italian razza, of uncertain origin

British Dictionary definitions for racing (5 of 5)

race

3
/ (reɪs) /

noun

a ginger root

Word Origin for race

C15: from Old French rais, from Latin rādīx a root
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for racing

race

[ rās ]

n.

A local geographic or global human population distinguished as a more or less distinct group by genetically transmitted physical characteristics.
A population of organisms differing from others of the same species in the frequency of hereditary traits; a subspecies.
A breed or strain, as of domestic animals.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for racing

race

[ rās ]

  1. An interbreeding, usually geographically isolated population of organisms differing from other populations of the same species in the frequency of hereditary traits. A race that has been given formal taxonomic recognition is known as a subspecies.
  2. A breed or strain, as of domestic animals.
Any of several extensive human populations associated with broadly defined regions of the world and distinguished from one another on the basis of inheritable physical characteristics, traditionally conceived as including such traits as pigmentation, hair texture, and facial features. Because the number of genes responsible for such physical variations is tiny in comparison to the size of the human genome and because genetic variation among members of a traditionally recognized racial group is generally as great as between two such groups, most scientists now consider race to be primarily a social rather than a scientific concept.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with racing

race


see rat race; slow but sure (steady wins the race).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.