radicalism

[rad-i-kuh-liz-uh m]

Origin of radicalism

First recorded in 1810–20; radical + -ism
Related formsan·ti·rad·i·cal·ism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for radicalism

Contemporary Examples of radicalism

  • The Gorge has always been a hotbed of radicalism and arms smuggling, but now it is fast becoming a shahid factory.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Secret Life of an ISIS Warlord

    Will Cathcart, Vazha Tavberidze, Nino Burchuladze

    October 27, 2014

  • Akkari, once infected by with the virus of radicalism, now possesses all the curiosity of a university student.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Repentant Radical

    Michael Moynihan

    September 17, 2013

  • Even if violence and radicalism don't cross the border, the cost of the refugee crisis is becoming unbearable for them.

  • But one of the biggest factors that has helped the growth of British Islamic radicalism is marriage.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Why the Turn to Terror?

    David Frum

    April 22, 2013

  • Fortunately, TIME Magazine is reporting many of the books may have been saved from the fires of radicalism.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Mali's Jihadists Burn their Own History

    Justin Green

    January 29, 2013

Historical Examples of radicalism


British Dictionary definitions for radicalism

radicalism

noun
  1. the principles, desires, or practices of political radicals
  2. a radical movement, esp in politics
  3. the state or nature of being radical, esp in politics
Derived Formsradicalistic, adjectiveradicalistically, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for radicalism
n.

1819 in the political sense, from radical (adj.) + -ism.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper