raffles

[ raf-uh lz ]
/ ˈræf əlz /

noun (often initial capital letter)

a gentlemanly burglar, amateur housebreaker, or the like.

Origin of raffles

1925–30; after Raffles, hero of The Amateur Cracksman, by E. W. Hornung (1866–1921), English novelist

Definition for raffles (2 of 4)

Raffles

[ raf-uh lz ]
/ ˈræf əlz /

noun

Sir Thomas Stamford,1781–1826, English colonial administrator in the East Indies.

Definition for raffles (3 of 4)

raffle

1
[ raf-uh l ]
/ ˈræf əl /

noun

a form of lottery in which a number of persons buy one or more chances to win a prize.

verb (used with object), raf·fled, raf·fling.

to dispose of by a raffle (often followed by off): to raffle off a watch.

verb (used without object), raf·fled, raf·fling.

to take part in a raffle.

Origin of raffle

1
1350–1400; Middle English rafle dice game < Middle French, derivative of rafler to snatch; cf. raff

Related forms

raf·fler, nounun·raf·fled, adjective

Definition for raffles (4 of 4)

raffle

2
[ raf-uh l ]
/ ˈræf əl /

noun

Nautical. a tangle, as of ropes, canvas, etc.

Origin of raffle

2
First recorded in 1790–1800; raff + -le
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for raffles

British Dictionary definitions for raffles (1 of 2)

Raffles

/ (ˈræfəlz) /

noun

Sir Thomas Stamford . 1781–1826, British colonial administrator: founded Singapore (1819) as a station for the British East India Company

British Dictionary definitions for raffles (2 of 2)

raffle

/ (ˈræfəl) /

noun

  1. a lottery in which the prizes are goods rather than money
  2. (as modifier)a raffle ticket

verb

(tr often foll by off) to dispose of (goods) in a raffle

Derived Forms

raffler, noun

Word Origin for raffle

C14 (a dice game): from Old French, of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012