rain check

or rain·check


noun

a ticket for future use given to spectators at an outdoor event, as a baseball game or concert, that has been postponed or interrupted by rain.
an offered or requested postponement of an invitation until a more convenient, usually unspecified time: Since you can't join us for dinner, we'll give you a rain check.
a ticket, coupon, or the like, entitling a customer to purchase at a later date and for the same amount a sale item that is temporarily out of stock.

Nearby words

  1. raiment,
  2. raimondi,
  3. raimondi, marcantonio,
  4. rain,
  5. rain cats and dogs,
  6. rain cloud,
  7. rain dance,
  8. rain date,
  9. rain forest,
  10. rain frog

Origin of rain check

First recorded in 1880–85

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for raincheck

rain check

noun

US and Canadian a ticket stub for a baseball or other game that allows readmission on a future date if the event is cancelled because of rain
the deferral of acceptance of an offer, esp a voucher issued to a customer wishing to purchase a sale item that is temporarily out of stock, enabling him or her to buy it at the special price when next the item is available
take a rain check informal to accept the postponement of an offer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for raincheck

raincheck

n.

also rain-check, rain check, 1884; see rain (n.) + check (n.1). Originally of tickets to rained-out baseball games.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with raincheck

rain check

A promise that an unaccepted offer will be renewed in the future, as in I can't come to dinner Tuesday but hope you'll give me a rain check. This term comes from baseball, where in the 1880s it became the practice to offer paying spectators a rain check entitling them to future admission for a game that was postponed or ended early owing to bad weather. By the early 1900s the term was transferred to tickets for other kinds of entertainment, and later to a coupon entitling a customer to buy, at a later date and at the same price, a sale item temporarily out of stock.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.