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rancor

[rang-ker]
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noun
  1. bitter, rankling resentment or ill will; hatred; malice.
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Also especially British, ran·cour.

Origin of rancor

1175–1225; Middle English rancour < Middle French < Late Latin rancōr- (stem of rancor) rancidity, equivalent to Latin ranc(ēre) (see rancid) + -ōr- -or1
Related formsran·cored; especially British, ran·coured, adjectiveun·ran·cored, adjective

Synonyms

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bitterness, spite, venom, animosity. See malevolence.

Antonyms

benevolence.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for rancour

Historical Examples

  • He did not dare express all his rancour, while he was unequal to suppressing it entirely.

    Homeward Bound

    James Fenimore Cooper

  • If he has any rancour or hardness in him it will bring it out.

  • The next was that his good spirits were also shared by Miss Bishop, and that she bore no rancour.

    Captain Blood

    Rafael Sabatini

  • All this aroused his rancour now, and steeled his heart against the voice of honour.

    The Tavern Knight

    Rafael Sabatini

  • The prince was stung to the quick, though for the moment he kept his rancour hidden.

    Cyropaedia

    Xenophon


British Dictionary definitions for rancour

rancour

US rancor

noun
  1. malicious resentfulness or hostility; spite
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Derived Formsrancorous, adjectiverancorously, adverbrancorousness, noun

Word Origin

C14: from Old French, from Late Latin rancor rankness
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for rancour

n.

chiefly British English spelling of rancor; for ending see -or. Related: Rancourous.

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rancor

n.

c.1200, from Old French rancor "bitterness, resentment; grief, affliction," from Late Latin rancorem (nominative rancor) "rancidness, a stinking smell" (Palladius); "grudge, bitterness" (Hieronymus and in Late Latin), from Latin rancere "to stink" (see rancid).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper