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View synonyms for rationalism

rationalism

[ rash-uh-nl-iz-uhm ]

noun

  1. the principle or habit of accepting reason as the supreme authority in matters of opinion, belief, or conduct.
  2. Philosophy.
    1. the doctrine that reason alone is a source of knowledge and is independent of experience.
    2. (in the philosophies of Descartes, Spinoza, etc.) the doctrine that all knowledge is expressible in self-evident propositions or their consequences.
  3. Theology. the doctrine that human reason, unaided by divine revelation, is an adequate or the sole guide to all attainable religious truth.
  4. Architecture. (often initial capital letter)
    1. a design movement principally of the mid-19th century that emphasized the development of modern ornament integrated with structure and the decorative use of materials and textures rather than as added adornment.
    2. the doctrines and practices of this movement. Compare functionalism ( def 1 ).


rationalism

/ ˈræʃənəˌlɪzəm /

noun

  1. reliance on reason rather than intuition to justify one's beliefs or actions
  2. philosophy
    1. the doctrine that knowledge about reality can be obtained by reason alone without recourse to experience
    2. the doctrine that human knowledge can all be encompassed within a single, usually deductive, system
    3. the school of philosophy initiated by Descartes which held both the above doctrines
  3. the belief that knowledge and truth are ascertained by rational thought and not by divine or supernatural revelation


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Derived Forms

  • ˌrationalˈistic, adjective
  • ˈrationalist, noun
  • ˌrationalˈistically, adverb

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Other Words From

  • ration·al·ist noun
  • ration·al·istic ration·al·isti·cal adjective
  • ration·al·isti·cal·ly adverb
  • anti·ration·al·ism noun
  • anti·ration·al·ist noun adjective
  • anti·ration·al·istic adjective
  • non·ration·al·ism noun
  • non·ration·al·ist noun
  • nonra·tion·al·istic adjective
  • nonra·tion·al·isti·cal adjective
  • nonra·tion·al·isti·cal·ly adverb

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Word History and Origins

Origin of rationalism1

First recorded in 1790–1800; rational + -ism

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Example Sentences

Today, most of us view scientific rationalism and spiritualist belief as mutually exclusive.

Raymond Guidot, the French design expert, says that Bellini came to Olivetti as "the champion of utter rationalism."

Yes, Holmes was the quintessence of the Victorian rationalism, “the most perfect and reasoning machine that the world had seen.”

He was the founder of Tao-tze, a kind of rationalism, which at present has millions of adherents in China.

The denial of universal ideas is rationalism and materialism in philosophy, as it is Pelagianism and Arminianism in theology.

Anselm had successfully battled with the rationalism of Roscelin, and also had furnished a new argument for the existence of God.

Similar superstitions attached to somnabulism; see Lecky, “History of Rationalism,” vol.

How far the gloomy materialism and superficial rationalism of Lewes may have affected the opinions of Miss Evans we cannot tell.

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rational horizonrationality