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rax

[ raks ]
/ ræks /
Scot. and North England
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verb (used without object)
to stretch oneself, as after sleeping.
to extend the hand.
verb (used with object)
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Origin of rax

First recorded before 1000; Middle English (north) rasken, raxen, Old English racsan, raxan; akin to Old English reccan, reccean “to stretch,” German recken
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use rax in a sentence

  • It's twa-three days since the doctor certifiedst him; noo his muscles hae stiffened and raxed him up.

  • Cloured crowns were plenty, and raxed necks came into fashion.

    Red Gauntlet|Sir Walter Scott
  • What deevil could he hae to say to Jeanie Deans, or to ony woman on earth, that he suld gang awa and get his neck raxed for her?

  • I daresay I do, and I wish to God it was only this raxed arm that was the worst of my ailment.

    John Splendid|Neil Munro

British Dictionary definitions for rax

rax
/ (ræks) Scot /

verb
(tr) to stretch or extend
(intr) to reach out
(tr) to pass or give (something to a person) with the outstretched hand; reachrax me the salt
(tr) to strain or sprain
noun
the act of stretching or straining

Word Origin for rax

Old English raxan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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