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sack

1
[ sak ]
/ sæk /
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See synonyms for: sack / sacked / sacking on Thesaurus.com

noun

verb (used with object)

Verb Phrases

sack out, Slang. to go to bed; fall asleep.

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Idioms for sack

    hit the sack, Slang. to go to bed; go to sleep: He never hits the sack before midnight.
    leave holding the sack. bag (def. 30).

Origin of sack

1
First recorded before 1000; 1940–45 for def. 5; Middle English noun sak, sak(k)e Old English sacc, from Latin saccus “bag, sack, sackcloth,” from Greek sákkos “bag made from goat hair, sieve, burlap, large cloak (as for a wedding dress),” from Semitic; compare Hebrew, Phoenician śaq “cloth made of hair, bag, mourning dress”

regional variation note for sack

See bag.

OTHER WORDS FROM sack

sacklike, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH sack

sac, sack , sacque

Definition for sack (2 of 3)

sack2
[ sak ]
/ sæk /

verb (used with object)

to pillage or loot after capture; plunder: to sack a city.

noun

the plundering of a captured place; pillage: the sack of Troy.

Origin of sack

2
First recorded in 1540–50; from Middle French phrase mettre à sac “to put to pillage”; sac, in this sense from Italian sacco “looting, loot,” shortened form of saccomano, from Middle High German sakman “pillager” (conformed to sacco sack1)

synonym study for sack

1. See rob.

Definition for sack (3 of 3)

sack3
[ sak ]
/ sæk /

noun

a strong light-colored wine formerly imported from Spain and the Canary Islands.

Origin of sack

3
First recorded in 1525–35; from French (vin ) sec “dry (wine),” from Latin siccus “dry”; cf. sec1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for sack

British Dictionary definitions for sack (1 of 3)

sack1
/ (sæk) /

noun

verb (tr)

informal to dismiss from employment
to put into a sack or sacks

Derived forms of sack

sacklike, adjective

Word Origin for sack

Old English sacc, from Latin saccus bag, from Greek sakkos; related to Hebrew saq

British Dictionary definitions for sack (2 of 3)

sack2
/ (sæk) /

noun

the plundering of a place by an army or mob, usually involving destruction, slaughter, etc
American football a tackle on a quarterback which brings him down before he has passed the ball

verb

(tr) to plunder and partially destroy (a place)
American football to tackle and bring down a quarterback before he has passed the ball

Derived forms of sack

sacker, noun

Word Origin for sack

C16: from French phrase mettre à sac, literally: to put (loot) in a sack, from Latin saccus sack 1

British Dictionary definitions for sack (3 of 3)

sack3
/ (sæk) /

noun

archaic or trademark any dry white wine formerly imported into Britain from SW Europe

Word Origin for sack

C16 wyne seck, from French vin sec dry wine, from Latin siccus dry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with sack

sack

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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