rectify

[ rek-tuh-fahy ]
/ ˈrɛk təˌfaɪ /

verb (used with object), rec·ti·fied, rec·ti·fy·ing.

to make, put, or set right; remedy; correct: He sent them a check to rectify his account.
to put right by adjustment or calculation, as an instrument or a course at sea.
Chemistry. to purify (especially a spirit or liquor) by repeated distillation.
Electricity. to change (an alternating current) into a direct current.
to determine the length of (a curve).
Astronomy, Geography. to adjust (a globe) for the solution of any proposed problem.

Origin of rectify

1350–1400; Middle English rectifien < Middle French rectifier < Medieval Latin rēctificāre, equivalent to Latin rēct(us) right + -ificāre -ify

Related forms

non·rec·ti·fied, adjectiveself-rec·ti·fy·ing, adjectiveun·rec·ti·fied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rectified

British Dictionary definitions for rectified

rectify

/ (ˈrɛktɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (tr)

to put right; correct; remedy
to separate (a substance) from a mixture or refine (a substance) by fractional distillation
to convert (alternating current) into direct current
maths to determine the length of (a curve)
to cause (an object) to assume a linear motion or characteristic

Derived Forms

rectifiable, adjectiverectification, noun

Word Origin for rectify

C14: via Old French from Medieval Latin rectificāre to adjust, from Latin rectus straight + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for rectified

rectify

[ rĕktə-fī′ ]

v.

To set right; correct.
To refine or purify, especially by distillation.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.