recurring

[ ri-kur-ing, -kuhr- ]
/ rɪˈkɜr ɪŋ, -ˈkʌr- /

adjective

occurring or appearing again.

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Origin of recurring

OTHER WORDS FROM recurring

re·cur·ring·ly, adverbun·re·cur·ring, adjective

Definition for recurring (2 of 2)

recur
[ ri-kur ]
/ rɪˈkɜr /

verb (used without object), re·curred, re·cur·ring.

to occur again, as an event, experience, etc.
to return to the mind: The idea kept recurring.
to come up again for consideration, as a question.
to have recourse.

Origin of recur

1610–20; earlier: to recede < Latin recurrere to run back, equivalent to re- re- + currere to run
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for recurring

British Dictionary definitions for recurring

recur
/ (rɪˈkɜː) /

verb -curs, -curring or -curred (intr)

to happen again, esp at regular intervals
(of a thought, idea, etc) to come back to the mind
(of a problem, etc) to come up again
maths (of a digit or group of digits) to be repeated an infinite number of times at the end of a decimal fraction

Derived forms of recur

recurring, adjectiverecurringly, adverb

Word Origin for recur

C15: from Latin recurrere, from re- + currere to run
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for recurring

recur
[ rĭ-kûr ]

v.

To happen, come up, or show up again or repeatedly.
To return to one's attention or memory.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.