registration

[rej-uh-strey-shuh n]

noun


Origin of registration

1560–70; < Middle French < Medieval Latin registrātiōn- (stem of registrātiō). See registrate, -ion
Related formsreg·is·tra·tion·al, adjectivemis·reg·is·tra·tion, nounnon·reg·is·tra·tion, nounpre·reg·is·tra·tion, nounre·reg·is·tra·tion, nounsu·per·reg·is·tra·tion, nounun·der·reg·is·tra·tion, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for registration

Contemporary Examples of registration

Historical Examples of registration

  • And let the same rule be observed about the registration of the property of the metics.

    Laws

    Plato

  • "Let me see the registration slip from the Prefecture," he said, at last.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • The poet's registration in the parish records at Stratford is dated April 26, 1564.

    William Shakespeare

    Samuel Levy Bensusan

  • The duration of the registration of a print, label or trade-mark is twenty years.

  • The 5c registration stamp, when the present supply is exhausted, will be withdrawn.


British Dictionary definitions for registration

registration

noun

  1. the act of registering or state of being registered
  2. (as modifier)a registration number
an entry in a register
a group of people, such as students, who register at a particular time
a combination of organ or harpsichord stops used in the performance of a piece of music
Australian
  1. a tax payable by the owner of a motor vehicle
  2. the period paid for
Derived Formsregistrational, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for registration
n.

1560s, from Middle French registration and directly from Medieval Latin registrationem (nominative registratio) "a registering," noun of action from past participle stem of registrare (see register (v.)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper