relegate

[ rel-i-geyt ]
/ ˈrɛl ɪˌgeɪt /

verb (used with object), rel·e·gat·ed, rel·e·gat·ing.

to send or consign to an inferior position, place, or condition: He has been relegated to a post at the fringes of the diplomatic service.
to consign or commit (a matter, task, etc.), as to a person: He relegates the less pleasant tasks to his assistant.
to assign or refer (something) to a particular class or kind.
to send into exile; banish.

Origin of relegate

1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin relēgātus, past participle of relēgāre to send away, dispatch. See re-, legate

Related forms

rel·e·ga·ble [rel-i-guh-buhl] /ˈrɛl ɪ gə bəl/, adjectiverel·e·ga·tion, nounun·rel·e·ga·ble, adjectiveun·rel·e·gat·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for relegate

British Dictionary definitions for relegate

relegate

/ (ˈrɛlɪˌɡeɪt) /

verb (tr)

to move to a position of less authority, importance, etc; demote
(usually passive) mainly British to demote (a football team, etc) to a lower division
to assign or refer (a matter) to another or others, as for action or decision
(foll by to) to banish or exile
to assign (something) to a particular group or category

Derived Forms

relegatable, adjectiverelegation, noun

Word Origin for relegate

C16: from Latin relēgāre to send away, from re- + lēgāre to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012