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rescue

[ res-kyoo ]
/ ˈrɛs kyu /
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See synonyms for: rescue / rescued / rescuing on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), res·cued, res·cu·ing.
to free or deliver from confinement, danger, or difficulty: The police were able to rescue the hostages in time.She rescued me from an awkward conversation.
Law. to liberate or take by forcible or illegal means from lawful custody.
noun
adjective
of or relating to someone or something trained or equipped to rescue: The county's three certified rescue dogs and their handlers searched for earthquake survivors in the rubble.
of or relating to a domestic animal adopted or available for adoption from an animal shelter or other animal welfare group: rescue puppies and kittens looking for loving families.
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Origin of rescue

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English verb rescuen, from Old French rescourre, equivalent to re- + escourre “to shake, drive out, remove,” from Latin excutere (ex- + -cutere, combining form of quatere “to shake”); see origin at re-, ex-1

OTHER WORDS FROM rescue

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use rescue in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rescue

rescue
/ (ˈrɛskjuː) /

verb -cues, -cuing or -cued (tr)
to bring (someone or something) out of danger, attack, harm, etc; deliver or save
to free (a person) from legal custody by force
law to seize (goods or property) by force
noun
  1. the act or an instance of rescuing
  2. (as modifier)a rescue party
the forcible removal of a person from legal custody
law the forcible seizure of goods or property

Derived forms of rescue

rescuable, adjectiverescuer, noun

Word Origin for rescue

C14: rescowen, from Old French rescourre, from re- + escourre to pull away, from Latin excutere to shake off, from quatere to shake
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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