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resistivity

[ ree-zis-tiv-i-tee ]
/ ˌri zɪsˈtɪv ɪ ti /
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noun
the power or property of resistance.
Also called specific resistance. Electricity. the resistance between opposite faces of a one-centimeter cube of a given material; ratio of electric intensity to cross-sectional area; reciprocal of conductivity.
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Origin of resistivity

First recorded in 1880–85; resistive + -ity
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use resistivity in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for resistivity

resistivity
/ (ˌriːzɪsˈtɪvɪtɪ) /

noun
the electrical property of a material that determines the resistance of a piece of given dimensions. It is equal to RA/l, where R is the resistance, A the cross-sectional area, and l the length, and is the reciprocal of conductivity. It is measured in ohmsSymbol: ρ Former name: specific resistance
the power or capacity to resist; resistance
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for resistivity

resistivity
[ rē′zĭs-tĭvĭ-tē ]

A measure of the potential electrical resistance of a conductive material. It is determined experimentally using the equation ρ = RA/l, where R is the measured resistance of some length of the material, A is its cross-sectional area (which must be uniform), and l is its length. It is measured in ohm-meters.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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