resolution

[ rez-uh-loo-shuhn ]
/ ˌrɛz əˈlu ʃən /

noun


Nearby words

  1. resojet engine,
  2. resole,
  3. resoluble,
  4. resolute,
  5. resolutely,
  6. resolutioner,
  7. resolutive,
  8. resolvable,
  9. resolve,
  10. resolved

Origin of resolution

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin resolūtiōn- (stem of resolūtiō), equivalent to resolūt(us) resolute + -iōn- -ion

Related formsnon·res·o·lu·tion, nounpre·res·o·lu·tion, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for resolution


British Dictionary definitions for resolution

resolution

/ (ˌrɛzəˈluːʃən) /

noun

Derived Formsresolutioner or resolutionist, noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for resolution

resolution

n.

late 14c., "a breaking into parts," from Old French resolution (14c.) or directly from Latin resolutionem (nominative resolutio) "process of reducing things into simpler forms," from past participle stem of resolvere "loosen" (see resolve). Sense of "a solving" (as of mathematical problems) first recorded 1540s, as is that of "power of holding firmly" (cf. resolute). Sense of "decision or expression of a meeting" is from c.1600. Meaning "effect of an optical instrument" is from 1860.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for resolution

resolution

[ rĕz′ə-lōōshən ]

n.

The subsiding or termination of an abnormal condition, such as a fever or an inflammation.
The act or process of separating or reducing something into its constituent parts.
The fineness of detail that can be distinguished in an image, as on a video display terminal.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.