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revere

1
[ ri-veer ]
/ rɪˈvɪər /
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verb (used with object), re·vered, re·ver·ing.
to regard with respect tinged with awe; venerate: The child revered her grandmother.
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Origin of revere

1
First recorded in 1655–65; from Latin reverērī, equivalent to re- re- + verērī “to stand in awe of, fear, feel reverence” (akin to ware2)

OTHER WORDS FROM revere

re·ver·a·ble, adjectivere·ver·er, noun

Other definitions for revere (2 of 3)

revere2
[ ri-veer ]
/ rɪˈvɪər /

noun

Other definitions for revere (3 of 3)

Revere
[ ri-veer ]
/ rɪˈvɪər /

noun
Paul, 1735–1818, American silversmith and patriot, famous for his night horseback ride, April 18, 1775, to warn Massachusetts colonists of the coming of British troops.
a city in E Massachusetts, on Massachusetts Bay, near Boston: seaside resort.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use revere in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for revere (1 of 2)

revere
/ (rɪˈvɪə) /

verb
(tr) to be in awe of and respect deeply; venerate

Derived forms of revere

reverable, adjectivereverer, noun

Word Origin for revere

C17: from Latin reverēri, from re- + verērī to fear, be in awe of

British Dictionary definitions for revere (2 of 2)

Revere
/ (rɪˈvɪə) /

noun
Paul . 1735–1818, American patriot and silversmith, best known for his night ride on April 18, 1775, to warn the Massachusetts colonists of the coming of the British troops
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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