respect

[ ri-spekt ]
/ rɪˈspɛkt /

noun

verb (used with object)

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Idioms for respect

Origin of respect

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English noun from Old French or directly from Latin respectus “action of looking back, consideration, regard,” equivalent to respec-, variant stem of respicere “to look back” (re- “back” + specere “to look”) + -tus suffix of verbal action; verb from Latin respectus, past participle of respicere; see re-

synonym study for respect

3. Respect, esteem, veneration imply recognition of personal qualities by approbation, deference, and more or less affection. Respect is commonly the result of admiration and approbation, together with deference: to feel respect for a great scholar. Esteem is deference combined with admiration and often with affection: to hold a friend in great esteem. Veneration is an almost religious attitude of deep respect, reverence, and love, such as we feel for persons or things of outstanding superiority, endeared by long association: veneration for one's grandparents, for noble traditions.

historical usage of respect

In Middle English, the more common meanings of the noun respect ( respect, respecte ) are “relation, relationship, regard, consideration” (still current meanings), present in Old French respect and Latin respectus, literally, “the act of looking back.”
The meaning “esteem for a person, thing, or quality” first appeared in 1526; the corresponding verb meaning “to hold in esteem” is first recorded in 1583. The prepositional phrase with respect to “referring to; concerning” dates to the mid-16th century. The plural noun respects “a formal expression or gesture of greeting, esteem, or friendship” dates to the first half of the 17th century; the phrase to pay one’s respects “to make a visit in order to welcome, greet, etc., or to express one's sympathy, especially after a death” dates to the middle of the 17th century.

OTHER WORDS FROM respect

qua·si-re·spect·ed, adjectiveun·der·re·spect·ed, adjectiveun·re·spect·ed, adjectivewell-re·spect·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for respect

British Dictionary definitions for respect

respect
/ (rɪˈspɛkt) /

noun

verb (tr)

Word Origin for respect

C14: from Latin rēspicere to look back, pay attention to, from re- + specere to look
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with respect

respect

see in regard (respect) to; pay a call (one's respects); with all due respect.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.