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rhapsody

[ rap-suh-dee ]
/ ˈræp sə di /
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noun, plural rhap·so·dies.

Music. an instrumental composition irregular in form and suggestive of improvisation.
an ecstatic expression of feeling or enthusiasm.
an epic poem, or a part of such a poem, as a book of the Iliad, suitable for recitation at one time.
a similar piece of modern literature.
an unusually intense or irregular poem or piece of prose.
Archaic. a miscellaneous collection; jumble.

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Origin of rhapsody

1535–45; <Latin rhapsōdia<Greek rhapsōidía recital of epic poetry, equivalent to rhapsōid(ós) rhapsodist + -ia-y3
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for rhapsody

rhapsody
/ (ˈræpsədɪ) /

noun plural -dies

music a composition free in structure and highly emotional in character
an expression of ecstatic enthusiasm
(in ancient Greece) an epic poem or part of an epic recited by a rhapsodist
a literary work composed in an intense or exalted style
rapturous delight or ecstasy
obsolete a medley

Word Origin for rhapsody

C16: via Latin from Greek rhapsōidia, from rhaptein to sew together + ōidē song
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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