rhumba

[ ruhm-buh, roo m-, room- ]
/ ˈrʌm bə, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum- /

noun, plural rhum·bas [ruhm-buh z, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bəz, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/, verb (used without object), rhum·baed [ruhm-buh d, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bəd, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/, rhum·ba·ing [ruhm-buh-ing, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bə ɪŋ, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/.

Definition for rhumba (2 of 2)

rumba

or rhum·ba

[ ruhm-buh, roo m-, room- ]
/ ˈrʌm bə, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum- /

noun, plural rum·bas [ruhm-buh z, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bəz, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/.

a dance, Cuban in origin and complex in rhythm.
an imitation or adaptation of this dance in the U.S.
music for this dance or in its rhythm.

verb (used without object), rum·baed [ruhm-buh d, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bəd, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/, rum·ba·ing [ruhm-buh-ing, roo m-, room-] /ˈrʌm bə ɪŋ, ˈrʊm-, ˈrum-/.

to dance the rumba.

Origin of rumba

Borrowed into English from American Spanish around 1920–25
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for rhumba

  • Everybody had joined the first couple in the rhumba, making the scene more hilarious by not having any clothes on at all.

    Hookers|Richard F. Mann

British Dictionary definitions for rhumba (1 of 2)

rhumba

/ (ˈrʌmbə, ˈrʊm-) /

noun plural -bas

a variant spelling of rumba

British Dictionary definitions for rhumba (2 of 2)

rumba

rhumba

/ (ˈrʌmbə, ˈrʊm-) /

noun

a rhythmic and syncopated Cuban dance in duple time
a ballroom dance derived from this
a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance

Word Origin for rumba

C20: from Spanish: lavish display, of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012