Advertisement

Advertisement

View synonyms for rid

rid

1

[ rid ]

verb (used with object)

, rid or rid·ded, rid·ding.
  1. to clear, disencumber, or free of something objectionable (usually followed by of ):

    I want to rid the house of mice. In my opinion, you'd be wise to rid yourself of the smoking habit.

  2. to relieve or disembarrass (usually followed by of ):

    to rid the mind of doubt.

  3. Archaic. to deliver or rescue:

    to rid them out of bondage; to rid him from his enemies.



rid

2

[ rid ]

verb

, Archaic.
  1. a simple past tense and past participle of ride.

rid

/ rɪd /

verb

  1. foll by of to relieve or deliver from something disagreeable or undesirable; make free (of)

    to rid a house of mice

  2. get rid of
    to relieve or free oneself of (something or someone unpleasant or undesirable)


Discover More

Derived Forms

  • ˈridder, noun
Discover More

Other Words From

  • ridder noun
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of rid1

1150–1200; Middle English ridden (v.), Old English ( ge ) ryddan to clear (land); cognate with Old Norse rythja to clear, empty
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of rid1

C13 (meaning: to clear land): from Old Norse rythja ; related to Old High German riutan to clear land
Discover More

Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. be rid of, to be free of or no longer encumbered by:

    to be rid of obligations.

  2. get rid of, to eliminate or discard:

    It's time we got rid of this trash.

More idioms and phrases containing rid

see get rid of .
Discover More

Example Sentences

We know from history that trying to get rid of them won’t work.

Steven Bradford, a Democrat from Gardena, told the Assembly Judiciary Committee Wednesday that there are mechanisms for getting rid of bad politicians, doctors, lawyers — but not the people with legal authority to commit force and take lives.

As a result of that legal effort, though, Solana Beach could soon become the second city in North County to voluntarily get rid of its illegal email retention policy.

While it’s efficient for sales teams to sell a suite of products, decentralizing gets rid of the expertise.

From Digiday

That made Carson and his colleagues wonder if getting rid of the suppressor cells could create an environment for checkpoint blockers to work better.

“I sense that mobile games are starting to shed their skin, getting rid of all the dead things they carry around,” he says.

In fact, there is still a lot to do to rid the entire world of gay inequality.

Meanwhile advocacy groups like GLAAD help rid our larger culture of hidden biases and bigotry.

“He was talking about getting rid of Savannah two weeks off her maternity leave,” says the NBC News type.

“The Americans were a tool, used by the Safis in the Pech to rid them of their competition in the timber trade,” Zalwar Khan said.

I shall only be away for six months; you know I have made up my mind to get rid of the whole bag of tricks.

But I couldn't get rid of the notion that he would hand me out the same dose he had given MacRae if only he had the power.

To get rid of our lamentations, the captain launched out in praises of the charming little town, and had us conveyed to land.

The English authorities expressly allege a deliberate purpose on Bruce's part to rid himself of his rival.

That Gilly run'd away, to get rid on ye, an' went an' listed for a soger, an' be gone to forin parts.

Advertisement

Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


rictusridable