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roche moutonnée

[ rohsh -moot-n-ey; French rawsh moo-taw-ney ]
/ ˈroʊʃ ˌmut nˈeɪ; French rɔʃ mu tɔˈneɪ /
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noun Geology.
a rounded, glacially eroded rock outcrop, usually one of a group, resembling a sheep's back.
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Also called sheepback rock.

Origin of roche moutonnée

1835–45; <French: glaciated rock, literally, fleecy rock
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use roche moutonnée in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for roche moutonnée

roche moutonnée
/ (ˈrəʊʃ ˌmuːtəˈneɪ) /

noun plural roches moutonnées (ˈrəʊʃ ˌmuːtəˈneɪz)
a rounded mass of rock smoothed and striated by ice that has flowed over it

Word Origin for roche moutonnée

C19: French, literally: fleecy rock, from mouton sheep
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for roche moutonnée

roche moutonnée
[ rôsh′ mōōt′n-ā, mōō′tô-nā ]

An elongate mound of bedrock worn smooth and rounded by glacial abrasion. A roche moutonnée has a long axis parallel to the direction of glacial movement, a gently sloping, striated side facing the direction from which the glacier originated, and a steeper side facing the direction of glacial movement. The height, length, and width of roche moutonnées are on the order of a few meters (tens of feet).
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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