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rodent

[ rohd-nt ]
/ ˈroʊd nt /
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adjective
belonging or pertaining to the gnawing or nibbling mammals of the order Rodentia, including the mice, squirrels, beavers, etc.
noun
a rodent mammal.
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Origin of rodent

1825–35; <New Latin RodentiaRodentia

OTHER WORDS FROM rodent

ro·dent·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use rodent in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rodent

rodent
/ (ˈrəʊdənt) /

noun
  1. any of the relatively small placental mammals that constitute the order Rodentia, having constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing. The group includes porcupines, rats, mice, squirrels, marmots, etc
  2. (as modifier)rodent characteristics

Derived forms of rodent

rodent-like, adjective

Word Origin for rodent

C19: from Latin rōdere to gnaw, corrode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for rodent

rodent
[ rōdnt ]

Any of various very numerous, mostly small mammals of the order Rodentia, having large front teeth used for gnawing. The teeth grow throughout the animal's life, and are kept from getting too long by gnawing. Rodents make up about half the living species of mammals, and include rats, mice, beavers, squirrels, lemmings, shrews, and hamsters.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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