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roger

[roj-er]
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interjection
  1. Informal. all right; O.K.
  2. message received and understood (a response to radio communications).
  3. (often initial capital letter) Jolly Roger.
  4. (formerly used in communications to represent the letter R.)
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Origin of roger

from the name Roger; in def. 2 representing r(eceived)

Roger

[roj-er]
noun
  1. a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “fame” and “spear.”
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for roger

absolutely, affirmative, amen, assuredly, aye, certainly, definitely, exactly, fine, gladly, good, granted, indubitably, naturally, okay, positively, precisely, surely, undoubtedly, unquestionably

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Contemporary Examples of roger

Historical Examples of roger


British Dictionary definitions for roger

roger

interjection
  1. (used in signalling, telecommunications, etc) message receivedCompare wilco
  2. an expression of agreement
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verb
  1. slang (of a man) to copulate (with)
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Word Origin for roger

C20: from the name Roger, representing R for received

usage

The verb sense of this word was formerly considered to be taboo, and it was labelled as such in previous editions of Collins English Dictionary . However, it has now become acceptable in speech, although some older or more conservative people may object to its use
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for roger

Roger

masc. proper name, from Old French Rogier, from Old High German Hrotger, literally "famous with the spear," from hruod- "fame, glory" + ger "spear" (see gar (n.)). As a generic name for "a person," attested from 1630s. Slang meaning "penis" was popular c.1650-c.1870; hence the slang verb sense of "to copulate with (a woman)," attested from 1711.

The use of the word in radio communication to mean "yes, I understand" is attested from 1941, from the U.S. military phonetic alphabet word for the letter -R-, in this case an abbreviation for "received." Said to have been used by the R.A.F. since 1938. The Jolly Roger pirate flag is first attested 1723, of unknown origin; jolly here has its otherwise obsolete Middle English sense "high-hearted, gallant." Roger de Coverley, once a favorite English country dance, is so called from 1685, in reference to Addison's character in the "Spectator." French roger-bontemps "jovial, carefree man," is attested there from 15c.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper