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rook

1
[ rook ]
/ rʊk /
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noun
a black, European crow, Corvus frugilegus, noted for its gregarious habits.
a sharper at cards or dice; swindler.
verb (used with object)
to cheat; fleece; swindle.
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Origin of rook

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English rok(e), Old English hrōc; cognate with Old Norse hrōkr, Old High German hruoh

Other definitions for rook (2 of 2)

rook2
[ rook ]
/ rʊk /

noun Chess.
one of two pieces of the same color that may be moved any number of unobstructed squares horizontally or vertically; castle.

Origin of rook

2
1300–50; Middle English rok<Old French roc<Arabic rukhkh<Persian rukh
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use rook in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for rook (1 of 2)

rook1
/ (rʊk) /

noun
a large Eurasian passerine bird, Corvus frugilegus, with a black plumage and a whitish base to its bill: family Corvidae (crows)
slang a swindler or cheat, esp one who cheats at cards
verb
(tr) slang to overcharge, swindle, or cheat

Word Origin for rook

Old English hrōc; related to Old High German hruoh, Old Norse hrōkr

British Dictionary definitions for rook (2 of 2)

rook2
/ (rʊk) /

noun
a chesspiece that may move any number of unoccupied squares in a straight line, horizontally or verticallyAlso called: castle

Word Origin for rook

C14: from Old French rok, ultimately from Arabic rukhkh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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