Idioms

Origin of rope

before 900; (noun) Middle English rop(e), rap(e), Old English rāp; cognate with Dutch reep, German Reif; (v.) Middle English, derivative of the noun
Related formsrop·er, nounrope·like, adjectiveun·roped, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for rope in (1 of 2)

rope in


verb (tr, adverb)

British to persuade to take part in some activity
US and Canadian to trick or entice into some activity

British Dictionary definitions for rope in (2 of 2)

rope

/ (rəʊp) /

noun

verb

See also rope in

Word Origin for rope

Old English rāp; related to Old Saxon rēp, Old High German reif
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with rope in (1 of 2)

rope in


Also, rope into. Lure or entice someone into doing something, as in We didn't want to spend the night there, but we got roped in by my lonely aunt, or The salesman tried to rope us into buying some worthless real estate. These expressions allude to catching an animal by throwing a rope around it. [Mid-1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with rope in (2 of 2)

rope


In addition to the idiom beginning with rope

  • rope in

also see:

  • end of one's rope
  • enough rope
  • (show someone) know the ropes
  • on the ropes
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.