round robin

or round-rob·in


noun

a sequence or series.
a petition, remonstrance, or the like, having the signatures arranged in circular form so as to disguise the order of signing.
a letter, notice, or the like, circulated from person to person in a group, often with individual comments being added by each.
Sports. a tournament in which all of the entrants play each other at least once, failure to win a contest not resulting in elimination.

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Origin of round robin

First recorded in 1540–50
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for round robin

British Dictionary definitions for round robin

round robin

noun

a letter, esp a petition or protest, having the signatures in a circle in order to disguise the order of signing
any letter or petition signed by a number of people
US and Canadian a tournament, as in a competitive game or sport, in which each player plays against every other player
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with round robin

round robin

1

A petition or other document signed by several persons in sequence, so that no one can tell who was the first to sign it. For example, We decided to send a round robin to management to protest the new rules about work hours. This term originally referred to a grievance presented by seamen to their captain, called round because of the circular sequence of names, but the source of robin has been lost. [Early 1700s]

2

In sports, a tournament in which each player or team plays against all of the others in turn. For example, The club always holds a tennis round robin on the Fourth of July. [Late 1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.