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rumour

US rumor

/ (ˈruːmə) /
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noun
  1. information, often a mixture of truth and untruth, passed around verbally
  2. (in combination)a rumour-monger
gossip or hearsay
archaic din or clamour
obsolete fame or reputation
verb
(tr; usually passive) to pass around or circulate in the form of a rumourit is rumoured that the Queen is coming
literary to make or cause to make a murmuring noise
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Word Origin for rumour

C14: via Old French from Latin rūmor common talk; related to Old Norse rymja to roar, Sanskrit rāut he cries
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

How to use rumour in a sentence

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