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run-through

[ ruhn-throo ]
/ ˈrʌnˌθru /
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noun
the performing of a sequence of designated actions, especially as a trial prior to actual performance; rehearsal; practice.
a quick outline or review: a run-through of his medical history.
adjective
(of a freight train) made up of cars for a single destination, usually routed so as to avoid congested areas and stopping only for a change of crew.
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Origin of run-through

First recorded in 1920–25; noun use of verb phrase run through
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use run-through in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for run-through

run through

verb
(tr, adverb) to transfix with a sword or other weapon
(intr, preposition) to exhaust (money) by wasteful spending; squander
(intr, preposition) to practise or rehearselet's run through the plan
(intr, preposition) to examine hastily
noun run-through
a practice or rehearsal
a brief survey
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with run-through

run through

1

Pierce, as in The soldier was run through by a bayonet. [c. 1400]

2

Use up quickly, as in She ran through her allowance in no time. [c. 1600]

3

Practice, review or rehearse quickly, as in Let's run through the first movement again, or The crew ran through the rescue procedures, or The attorney ran through the defense witness's testimony. [Mid-1400s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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