sacred

[ sey-krid ]
/ ˈseɪ krɪd /
||

adjective


Nearby words

  1. sacramento mountains,
  2. sacramento sturgeon,
  3. sacrarium,
  4. sacre bleu,
  5. sacrectomy,
  6. sacred baboon,
  7. sacred bamboo,
  8. sacred college,
  9. sacred cow,
  10. sacred heart

Origin of sacred

1275–1325; Middle English, orig. past participle of sacren to consecrate < Latin sacrāre to devote, derivative of sacer holy; see -ed2

SYNONYMS FOR sacred
2. venerable, divine. See holy. 4. consecrated. 5. revered. 6. sacrosanct. 7. inviolate, inviolable.

ANTONYMS FOR sacred

Related forms
Can be confusedsacred sacrosanct

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for sacredly


British Dictionary definitions for sacredly

sacred

/ (ˈseɪkrɪd) /

adjective

exclusively devoted to a deity or to some religious ceremony or use; holy; consecrated
worthy of or regarded with reverence, awe, or respect
protected by superstition or piety from irreligious actions
connected with or intended for religious usesacred music
dedicated to; in honour of
Derived Formssacredly, adverbsacredness, noun

Word Origin for sacred

C14: from Latin sacrāre to set apart as holy, from sacer holy

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for sacredly

sacred

adj.

late 14c., past participle adjective from obsolete verb sacren "to make holy" (c.1200), from Old French sacrer "consecrate, anoint, dedicate" (12c.) or directly from Latin sacrare "to make sacred, consecrate; hold sacred; immortalize; set apart, dedicate," from sacer (genitive sacri) "sacred, dedicated, holy, accursed," from Old Latin saceres, from PIE root *sak- "to sanctify." Buck groups it with Oscan sakrim, Umbrian sacra and calls it "a distinctive Italic group, without any clear outside connections." Related: Sacredness.

Nasalized form is sancire "make sacred, confirm, ratify, ordain." Sacred cow "object of Hindu veneration," is from 1891; figurative sense of "one who must not be criticized" is first recorded 1910, reflecting Western views of Hinduism. Sacred Heart "the heart of Jesus as an object of religious veneration" is from 1765.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper