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scattering

[ skat-er-ing ]
/ ˈskæt ər ɪŋ /
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See synonyms for: scattering / scatterings on Thesaurus.com

adjective
distributed or occurring here and there at irregular intervals; scattered.
straggling, as an assemblage of parts.
(of votes) cast in small numbers for various candidates.
distributing, dispersing, or separating.
noun
a small, scattered number or quantity.
Physics. the process in which a wave or beam of particles is diffused or deflected by collisions with particles of the medium that it traverses.
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Origin of scattering

Middle English word dating back to 1300–50; see origin at scatter, -ing2, -ing1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use scattering in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for scattering

scattering
/ (ˈskætərɪŋ) /

noun
a small amount
physics the process in which particles, atoms, etc, are deflected as a result of collision
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for scattering

scattering
[ skătər-ĭng ]

The spreading of a stream of particles or a beam of rays, as of light, over a range of directions as a result of collisions with other particles. The sky appears blue due to the tendency of air molecules to scatter blue and violet light more than light of other frequencies. The scattering probabilities and patterns of subatomic particles, accelerated by particle accelerators and aimed at a target, is a major component of experimental particle physics. See also diffusion cross section.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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