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View synonyms for scholastic

scholastic

[ skuh-las-tik ]

adjective

  1. of or relating to schools, school, scholars, or education:

    scholastic attainments.

  2. of or relating to secondary education or schools: school:

    a scholastic meet.

  3. of or relating to the medieval schoolmen.


noun

  1. (sometimes initial capital letter) a schoolman, a disciple of the schoolmen, or an adherent of scholasticism.
  2. a pedantic person.
  3. Roman Catholic Church. a student in a scholasticate.

scholastic

/ skəˈlæstɪk /

adjective

  1. of, relating to, or befitting schools, scholars, or education
  2. pedantic or precise
  3. often capital characteristic of or relating to the medieval Schoolmen


noun

  1. a student or pupil
  2. a person who is given to quibbling or logical subtleties; pedant
  3. often capital a disciple or adherent of scholasticism; Schoolman
    1. a Jesuit student who is undergoing a period of probation prior to commencing his theological studies
    2. the status and position of such a student
  4. a formalist in art

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Derived Forms

  • schoˈlastically, adverb

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Other Words From

  • scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • anti·scho·lastic adjective noun
  • anti·scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • hyper·scho·lastic adjective
  • hyper·scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • nonscho·lastic adjective
  • nonscho·lasti·cal adjective
  • nonscho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • postscho·lastic adjective
  • prescho·lastic adjective
  • proscho·lastic adjective
  • pseudo·scho·lastic adjective
  • pseudo·scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • quasi-scho·lastic adjective
  • quasi-scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • semi·scho·lastic adjective
  • semi·scho·lasti·cal·ly adverb
  • unscho·lastic adjective
  • unscho·lasti·cal·ly adverb

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Word History and Origins

Origin of scholastic1

1590–1600; < Latin scholasticus < Greek scholastikós studious, learned, derivative of scholázein to be at leisure to study. See school 1, -tic

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Word History and Origins

Origin of scholastic1

C16: via Latin from Greek skholastikos devoted to learning, ultimately from skholē school 1

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Example Sentences

He ultimately thought he had outgrown scholastic competition.

From Time

As peers stacked their schedules with ambitious scholastic extracurriculars, Calandrelli maintained good grades and did activities she loved but, in her words, “wasn’t very good at.”

I had an idea for a movie and I had a meeting with Scholastic Publishing because they have a movie division.

“There was a nice music to his writing,” says Lee Kravitz, his longtime editor at Scholastic and then at Parade.

The scholastic pitches finished, the campers returned to their doll designs.

Museum shows about collectors are usually either scholastic social history or obvious sucking-up to future donors.

This study associates higher body mass with lower scholastic achievement.

We have seen enough elsewhere of the multiplication of Commentaries on the Sentences of the Lombard and other scholastic works.

At these early types of Poor Law schools the children received both scholastic and industrial training.

The mass of newspaper readers are not, in a scholastic sense, well-educated persons.

His real education, as distinct from his scholastic one, had been immensely advanced thereby.

It is not the purpose of this volume to offer a mere textbook or a scholastic essay on historical events.

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