scout

1
[ skout ]
/ skaʊt /

noun

verb (used without object)

verb (used with object)

Origin of scout

1
1300–50; (v.) Middle English skowten < Old French escouter, escolter, ascolter (French écouter to listen) < Late Latin ascultāre, Latin auscultāre to listen; see auscultate; (noun) < Middle French escoute, derivative of escouter

Definition for scout (2 of 2)

scout2
[ skout ]
/ skaʊt /

verb (used with object)

to treat with scorn; dismiss.
to make fun of; deride; mock.

verb (used without object)

to scoff; jeer.

Origin of scout

2
1595–1605; perhaps < Old Norse skūta, skūt abuse, angry words. See shout
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for scout

British Dictionary definitions for scout (1 of 3)

scout1
/ (skaʊt) /

noun

verb

Derived forms of scout

scouter, noun

Word Origin for scout

C14: from Old French ascouter to listen to, from Latin auscultāre to auscultate

British Dictionary definitions for scout (2 of 3)

scout2
/ (skaʊt) /

verb

archaic to reject (a person or thing) with contempt

Word Origin for scout

C17: from Old Norse skūta derision

British Dictionary definitions for scout (3 of 3)

Scout
/ (skaʊt) /

noun

(sometimes not capital) a boy or (in some countries) a girl who is a member of a worldwide movement (the Scout Association) founded as the Boy Scouts in England in 1908 by Lord Baden-Powell with the aim of developing character and responsibilitySee also Air Scout, Girl Scout, Guide, Sea Scout, Venture Scout
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with scout

scout

see good egg (scout).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.