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seaborgium

[ see-bawr-gee-uhm, see-bawr- ]
/ siˈbɔr gi əm, ˈsi bɔr- /
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noun Chemistry, Physics.
a superheavy, synthetic, radioactive element with a very short half-life. Symbol: Sg; atomic number: 106.
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Formerly un·nil·hex·i·um [yoo-nil-hek-see-uhm], /ˌyu nɪlˈhɛk si əm/, el·e·ment 106 .

Origin of seaborgium

Named after U.S. chemist Glenn T. Seaborg; see -ium.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for seaborgium

seaborgium
/ (ˈsiːbɔːɡɪəm) /

noun
a synthetic transuranic element, synthesized and identified in 1974. Symbol: Sg; atomic no: 106

Word Origin for seaborgium

C20: named after Glenn Seaborg
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for seaborgium

seaborgium
[ sē-bôrgē-əm ]

n. Symbol Sg
A radioactive synthetic element whose longest-lived isotopes have mass numbers of 259, 261, 263, 265, and 266 with half-lives of 0.9, 0.23, 0.8, 16, and 20 seconds. Atomic number 106.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for seaborgium

seaborgium
[ sē-bôrgē-əm ]

Sg
A synthetic, radioactive element that is produced by bombarding californium with oxygen ions or bombarding lead with chromium ions. Its most long-lived isotopes have mass numbers 259, 261, 263, 265, and 266 with half-lives of 0.9, 0.23, 0.8, 16, and 20 seconds, respectively. Atomic number 106. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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