seeming

[ see-ming ]
/ ˈsi mɪŋ /

adjective

apparent; appearing, whether truly or falsely, to be as specified: a seeming advantage.

noun

appearance, especially outward or deceptive appearance.

Origin of seeming

1300–50; Middle English semynge; see seem, -ing2, -ing1

Related forms

seem·ing·ly, adverbseem·ing·ness, noun

Definition for seeming (2 of 2)

seem

[ seem ]
/ sim /

verb (used without object)

to appear to be, feel, do, etc.: She seems better this morning.
to appear to one's own senses, mind, observation, judgment, etc.: It seems to me that someone is calling.
to appear to exist: There seems no need to go now.
to appear to be true, probable, or evident: It seems likely to rain.
to give the outward appearance of being or to pretend to be: He only seems friendly because he wants you to like him.

Origin of seem

1150–1200; Middle English seme < Old Norse sœma to befit, beseem, derivative of sœmr fitting, seemly; akin to sōmi honor

SYNONYMS FOR seem

4 Seem, appear, look refer to an outward aspect that may or may not be contrary to reality. Seem is applied to something that has an aspect of truth and probability: It seems warmer today. Appear suggests the giving of an impression that may be superficial or illusory: The house appears to be deserted. Look more vividly suggests the use of the eye (literally or figuratively) or the aspect as perceived by the eye: She looked very much frightened.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for seeming

British Dictionary definitions for seeming (1 of 2)

seeming

/ (ˈsiːmɪŋ) /

adjective

(prenominal) apparent but not actual or genuineseeming honesty

noun

outward or false appearance

Derived Forms

seemingness, noun

British Dictionary definitions for seeming (2 of 2)

seem

/ (siːm) /

verb (may take an infinitive)

(copula) to appear to the mind or eye; lookthis seems nice; the car seems to be running well
to give the impression of existing; appear to bethere seems no need for all this nonsense
used to diminish the force of a following infinitive to be polite, more noncommittal, etcI can't seem to get through to you

Derived Forms

seemer, noun

Word Origin for seem

C12: perhaps from Old Norse soma to beseem, from sœmr befitting; related to Old English sēman to reconcile; see same

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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012