seep

[ seep ]
/ sip /

verb (used without object)

to pass, flow, or ooze gradually through a porous substance: Water seeps through cracks in the wall.
(of ideas, methods, etc.) to enter or be introduced at a slow pace: The new ideas finally seeped down to the lower echelons.
to become diffused; permeate: Fog seeped through the trees, obliterating everything.

verb (used with object)

to cause to seep; filter: The vodka is seeped through charcoal to purify it.

noun

moisture that seeps out; seepage.
a small spring, pool, or other place where liquid from the ground has oozed to the surface of the earth.

QUIZZES

HEED THE VOX POPULI, AND TAKE THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

Test your memory on these verbal firecrackers from the week of June 29 to July 5!
Question 1 of 7
anchorite

Origin of seep

1780–90; perhaps variant of dial. sipe, itself perhaps continuing Old English sīpian (cognate with Middle Low German sīpen)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for seep

British Dictionary definitions for seep

seep
/ (siːp) /

verb

(intr) to pass gradually or leak through or as if through small openings; ooze

noun

a small spring or place where water, oil, etc, has oozed through the ground
another word for seepage

Word Origin for seep

Old English sīpian; related to Middle High German sīfen, Swedish dialect sipa
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012