self-appointed

[self-uh-poin-tid]
adjective
  1. chosen by oneself to act in a certain capacity or to fulfill a certain function, especially pompously or self-righteously: a self-appointed guardian of the public's morals.

Origin of self-appointed

First recorded in 1790–1800
Related formsself-ap·point·ment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for self-appointed

Contemporary Examples of self-appointed

Historical Examples of self-appointed

  • They were not good enough, said their self-appointed leader.

    Pariah Planet

    Murray Leinster

  • How about that "committee of one" self-appointed at town meeting?

    Cy Whittaker's Place

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • But just consider what these self-appointed generals have achieved for you.

    Anabasis

    Xenophon

  • This self-appointed guide was no negro, no mulatto, of that Manuel was sure.

    Plotting in Pirate Seas

    Francis Rolt-Wheeler

  • Probably in half an hour I was relieved of my self-appointed task.


British Dictionary definitions for self-appointed

self-appointed

adjective
  1. having assumed authority without the agreement of othersa self-appointed critic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-appointed
adj.

1750, from self- + appointed.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper