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worship

[wur-ship]
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noun
  1. reverent honor and homage paid to God or a sacred personage, or to any object regarded as sacred.
  2. formal or ceremonious rendering of such honor and homage: They attended worship this morning.
  3. adoring reverence or regard: excessive worship of business success.
  4. the object of adoring reverence or regard.
  5. (initial capital letter) British. a title of honor used in addressing or mentioning certain magistrates and others of high rank or station (usually preceded by Your, His, or Her).
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verb (used with object), wor·shiped, wor·ship·ing or (especially British) wor·shipped, wor·ship·ping.
  1. to render religious reverence and homage to.
  2. to feel an adoring reverence or regard for (any person or thing).
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verb (used without object), wor·shiped, wor·ship·ing or (especially British) wor·shipped, wor·ship·ping.
  1. to render religious reverence and homage, as to a deity.
  2. to attend services of divine worship.
  3. to feel an adoring reverence or regard.
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Origin of worship

before 900; (noun) Middle English wors(c)hipe, worthssipe, Old English worthscipe, variant of weorthscipe; see worth1, -ship; (v.) Middle English, derivative of the noun
Related formswor·ship·er, nounwor·ship·ing·ly, adverbmis·wor·ship, verb, mis·wor·shiped, mis·wor·ship·ing or (especially British) mis·wor·shipped, mis·wor·ship·ping.pre·wor·ship, noun, verb, pre·wor·shiped, pre·wor·ship·ing or (especially British) pre·wor·shipped, pre·wor·ship·ping.self-wor·ship, nounself-wor·ship·er, nounself-wor·ship·ing, adjectiveself-wor·ship·ping, adjectiveun·wor·shiped, adjectiveun·wor·ship·ing, adjectiveun·wor·shipped, adjectiveun·wor·ship·ping, adjective

Synonyms

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

pridearroganceself-indulgencegreedselfishnessself-absorptionnarcissismself-confidenceegotismself-loveshowostentationpretensionairsvaingloryaffectationdisplayconceitednesssmugnessself-worship

Examples from the Web for self-worship

Historical Examples

  • It endangered the absoluteness of her self-belief and self-worship.

    The History of Sir Richard Calmady

    Lucas Malet

  • Thus, this view leads to humanity-worship or rather to self-worship.

    Evolution

    Joseph Le Conte

  • This free agency is nothing more than the self-worship of the poor slave.

  • She tore herself away from her self-worship and quickly began to dress.

    A Bed of Roses

    W. L. George

  • But self-worship and the craving for aggrandizement are in reality very uninspiring emotions.


British Dictionary definitions for self-worship

worship

verb -ships, -shipping or -shipped or US -ships, -shiping or -shiped
  1. (tr) to show profound religious devotion and respect to; adore or venerate (God or any person or thing considered divine)
  2. (tr) to be devoted to and full of admiration for
  3. (intr) to have or express feelings of profound adoration
  4. (intr) to attend services for worship
  5. (tr) obsolete to honour
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noun
  1. religious adoration or devotion
  2. the formal expression of religious adoration; rites, prayers, etc
  3. admiring love or devotion
  4. archaic dignity or standing
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Derived Formsworshipable, adjectiveworshipper, noun

Word Origin

Old English weorthscipe, from worth 1 + -ship

Worship

noun
  1. mainly British (preceded by Your, His, or Her) a title used to address or refer to a mayor, magistrate, or a person of similar high rank
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for self-worship

worship

n.

Old English worðscip, wurðscip (Anglian), weorðscipe (West Saxon) "condition of being worthy, honor, renown," from weorð "worthy" (see worth) + -scipe (see -ship). Sense of "reverence paid to a supernatural or divine being" is first recorded c.1300. The original sense is preserved in the title worshipful (c.1300).

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worship

v.

c.1200, from worship (n.). Related: Worshipped; worshipping.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper