set-in

[ set-in ]
/ ˈsɛtˌɪn /

adjective

made separately and placed within another unit.

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Origin of set-in

First recorded in 1525–35; adj. use of verb phrase set in
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for set-in

  • Those wide seams in the whitewashed ceiling must mean the cracks due to a set-in door.

    The Girl in the Mirror|Elizabeth Garver Jordan
  • In general the strongest flood does not set-in till Midsummer.

    Lachesis Lapponica|Carl von Linn
  • "It's a set-in rain, and we're goin' to have a hard time," Hubert complained.

    Captain Ted|Louis Pendleton
  • Fine weather may, perhaps, have set-in in the interval in all parts of the mountains.