set-back

[ set-bak ]
/ ˈsɛtˌbæk /

noun

Surveying. the interval by which a chain or tape exceeds the length being measured.

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Origin of set-back

special use of setback

Definition for setbacks (2 of 2)

setback
[ set-bak ]
/ ˈsɛtˌbæk /

noun

a check to progress; a reverse or defeat: The new law was a setback.
Architecture. a recession of the upper part of a building from the building line, as to lighten the structure or to permit a desired amount of light and air to reach ground level at the foot of the building.
an act or instance of setting back: A nightly setback of your home thermostats can save a great deal of fuel.
Also set-back. a downward temperature adjustment of a thermostat, especially performed automatically, as by a timer.

Origin of setback

First recorded in 1665–75; noun use of verb phrase set back
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

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